Braille Trail in Wyoming

Found in Cody Wyoming is a braille trail.  The trail has different surfaces at points of interest with signs in Braille.  A person with impaired vision using a cane would feel the tactile different in the ground surface and know that there is a point of interest.  The first Braille Nature Trail was dedicated in 1967 near Aspen, Colorado. Cody Wy braille trail

Memorial to the Rough Riders in Arlington National Cemetery

A memorial dedicated in 1907 that commemorates those members of the "Rough Riders" who died in the Spanish–American War in 1898. The Rough Riders were a Calgary unit formed by Teddy Roosevelt. They were nicknamed by the press the "Rough Riders" because most of the men were cowboys, frontiersmen, railroad workers, Native Americans, and similar "rough" people from the West.

A memorial dedicated in 1907 that commemorates those members of the “Rough Riders” who died in the Spanish–American War in 1898. The Rough Riders were a Calgary unit formed by Teddy Roosevelt. They were nicknamed by the press the “Rough Riders” because most of the men were cowboys, frontiersmen, railroad workers, Native Americans, and similar “rough” people from the West.

Aialik Glacier

The Aialik Glacier is a glacier in the Kenai Peninsula Borough of Alaska. It drains into Aialik Bay. Part of Kenai Fjords National Park, it (along with many other glaciers) drains the Harding Icefield. Aialik Glacier, a little over 15 miles from Seward, is the largest glacier in Aialik Bay, located in Kenai Fjords National Park. While fairly stable, the glacier calves most actively in May and June.

Wood as Old as the Hills

Escalante Petrified Forest State Park (also known as Escalante State Park) is a Utah State Park where you can enjoy the reservoir, camp and hike among petrified trees that are 150 million years old. The park is located just north of Escalante. Petrified wood forms when fallen trees get washed down a river and buried under layers of mud, ash from volcanoes and other materials. Over millions of years, these minerals crystallize within the wood’s cellular structure forming the stone-like material known as petrified wood.

Bryce Canyon Red Rock Hoodoos

Bryce Canyon National Park is an alpine forest with as many red rock hoodoos as trees. Water and wind over millions of years of freezes and thaws, have carved into the plateau endless fields of distinctive red rock pillars, called hoodoos, as well as into the park’s series of natural amphitheaters. And because Bryce Canyon National Park is at an elevation of 8,000 to 9,000 feet, there are even opportunities for winter sports like snowshoeing and cross-country skiing.

Scenic Highway 12

 Utah’s Scenic Byway 12, also known as “A Journey Through Time Scenic Byway.” What’s more, this stretch of pavement is also designated an All-American Road. Only one-third of America’s scenic byways get this distinction, and it’s given because these roads offer unique features that you can’t find elsewhere making these byways tourist destinations unto themselves. The All-American Road: Scenic Byway 12 connects U.S. 89 near Panguitch on the west with S.R. 24 near Torrey on the northeast.

Clouds over the Slickrock

Cloud formation over the slickrock in Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument The monument spans across nearly one million acres of America’s public lands. Due to its remote location and rugged landscape, the monument was one of the last places in the continental United States to be mapped. The majority of the land within the monument is wild, rugged, and much of it is inaccessible except on foot.

People’s Exchange Building

The People’s Exchange building in Escalante Utah is a 1901 Victorian commercial building. Built around 1901, People’s Exchange started as a co-op on what was then Main Street. The building is a fairly well preserved example of late Victorian Commercial. Standing beside and along the back side of the Exchange building is a Pre-1900 two story house. Victor E. Bean built the two story home prior to the construction of the store.

Ancient Pictures

Inside some of the caves in Grand Staircase-Escalante are ancient pictures that were carved on the walls.  The term “Anasazi” translates to “Ancient Ones”. Because the Anasazi people resigned to a village/farming lifestyle, much of their daily life has been left behind in ruins of Anasazi villages. Many of the Anasazi settlements are scattered throughout the Four Corners area of the Western United States, but there are a large amount of Anasazi villages in the Southern Utah area.